Tuesday, September 27, 2016

College-Bound Testing Info from OSPI

To note, the press release references a "federal fee reduction program" so that is one discount available to F/RL students for AP testing. I'm still checking about the state and the district.
Results released today by the College Board show that the number of students taking the SAT has remained steady but that PSAT and AP participation has increased.
A total of 39,967 Washington state public school students in the Class of 2016 took the SAT, a number virtually unchanged from 2015 (39,958 students). PSAT participation increased from 2015 to 2106 by 10.1 percent for 10th graders and by 3.5 percent for 11th graders. And participation in AP tests increased by 1.7 percent from 2015 to 2016.

In addition, more qualified students are taking advantage of the federal fee reduction program, which reduces the costs of the tests. In 2015-16, the percentage of students taking tests at a reduced cost was:

SAT:   16 percent of students (an increase of 1 percent from 2014-15),
PSAT: 29 percent (an increase of 11 percent) and
AP:     19 percent (an increase of 1 percent)

“I am pleased that every year, more and more students – especially unrepresented minorities – are taking the tests,” said Randy Dorn, state superintendent of public instruction. “It shows the commitment those students have to get to college and to be successful in college.”

While the reporting of race/ethnicity changed in 2016, making comparisons to previous years more difficult, breakdowns for each test are as follows:
PUBLIC SCHOOL PARTICIPATION IN WA, CLASS OF 2016


SAT
PSAT 10th grade
AP
Group
% of total
% of total
% of total
American Indian
1.3%
1.4
0.6
Asian
12.6
9.8
15.1
Black
5.4
4.8
2.8
Hispanic/Latino
14.0
18.8
13.2
Pacific Islander
0.4
1.4
0.8
White
54.0
48.8
57.3
Two or more races
2.8
6.1
8.0
Other
1.9
0.1
0.2
No Response
7.7
8.9
1.9

Average scores for the SAT were 501 in critical reading, 506 in math and 481 in writing. (Scores range from 200 to 800.) Because a new SAT was given starting in January 2016, the averages cannot easily be compared to previous years.

For the 10th grade PSAT, average scores were 470 for reading/writing and 470 for math. (Scores range from 160 to 760.) And for AP, 59.3 percent of tests earned scores of 3, 4 or 5, which generally qualify for college credit.

College entrance exams and some AP exams are legislatively approved alternatives to Washington’s high school exit exams. Students can apply to use qualifying scores to meet the assessment requirement for graduation, if they have first attempted to meet standard on a state exam. Students who transfer into Washington public schools in 11th or 12th grade from out of state or an in-state non-public school setting can apply for a “transfer student waiver” to use one of the alternatives without taking a state exam first.

4 comments:

Anonymous said...

So only 29% of juniors take the PSAT? And presumably there is some selection bias in who takes it? So perhaps it is not the best accountability measure for SPS after all.

-sleeper

Anonymous said...

It's an accountability measure? Used for teachers? Since when and why weren't we told this directly?
-NotMyScores

Jet City mom said...

Unless you think you would qualify for National Merit, what would be the reasoning to take the PSAT?

Anonymous said...

@ Jet City mom, if you're planning to go to college and will be taking the SAT, the PSAT can give you a good sense of how you'll perform, where you might want to concentrate your studying/practice, etc. It also often gets you on the list for a lot of colleges' outreach materials--not necessarily a plus for everyone and there are certainly other ways to get the same info, but it can be kind of fun, exciting and inspiring to start receiving college materials in the mail, including from schools of which you'd never heard.

college prep