Thursday, September 13, 2018

SBAC Results Released by OSPI

From OSPI Communications:


OLYMPIA—September 13, 2018—Results from state tests given this past spring were released Monday by the Office of Superintendent of Public Instruction (OSPI).

Called the Smarter Balanced Assessments, the tests were taken in English language arts (ELA) and math by students in 3rd through 8th grade and by high school students. The tests are based on Washington’s learning standards, adopted in 2011. Students in grades 5, 8, and 11 also took new science tests. These tests are based on the Next Generation Science Standards, adopted by Washington state in 2013.


Percent of students meeting standard*
 
English language arts
 
Math

Science
Gr.
2017
2018
Change**
 
2017
2018
Change**

2018
 3
52.2
55.5
3.3
 
57.5
57.5
0.0

 4
54.7
57.3
2.6
 
53.9
53.8
- 0.1


 5
58.2
59.2
1.0
 
48.3
48.5
0.2

55.2
 6
54.9
55.9
1.0
 
47.8
48.2
0.4


 7
59.5
59.6
0.1
 
49.5
49.0
- 0.5


 8
57.7
58.9
1.2
 
47.3
47.5
0.2

52.9
11








30.3
                       


ELA
Math
Gr.
2018
2018
10
69.5
40.6
* Among students who were expected to test
** Percentage-point difference between 2017 and 2018

Superintendent of Public Instruction Chris Reykdal said the results this year were mixed. “We’re seeing growth in nearly every student group on ELA, and we’re pleased with that,” he said. “The math results, though, are a bit flatter, and we know there is more work to be done.”

Analysis by OSPI showed gains by some groups of students, such as those receiving special education services and those experiencing poverty. The table below shows whether a group made more gains than the state average for all students in that grade and subject. Specifically, it compares percentage-point gains from 2017 to 2018 between each student group and all students as a whole. For example, among all students, proficiency in third grade ELA increased by 3.3 percentage points (shown above: 55.5 percent in 2018; 52.2 percent in 2017). For African-American students, the increase was 5.4 percentage points (40.4 percent in 2018; 35.0 percent in 2017), which was greater than the all-students group.

Gr.
AmInd-AlaskN
Asian
Black-AfrAm
Hisp-Latino
Lim English
Low Inc
Pac Isldr
Spec’l Ed
Two+ races
White

E M
E M
E M
E M
E M
E M
E M
E M
E M
E M
3
4
— —
5
— —
6
— —
— —
— —
7
8
— —
— —
— —
E = ELA; M = math. Dashes (“—“) represent little to no gains (+/- 0.35).
AmInd-AlaskN = American Indian/Alaskan Native, Black-AfrAm = Black/African American, Hisp-Latino = Hispanic/Latino, Lim English = Limited English proficiency, Low Inc = Low income, Pac Isldr = Pacific Islander, Spec’l Ed = Students receiving special education services, and Two+ races = two or more races

“We can see that gaps are closing for many student groups, but the size of the gaps will make it a long process,” Reykdal said. “I’ll be talking to legislators this coming session about actions to specifically address inequities among student groups, especially with students receiving special education services.”

“State test scores continue to be part of how we assess school districts,” he continued. “School improvement plans have been built using this data. But I want to be clear that students are more than a single test score, and our School Improvement Framework includes measures that go beyond test scores. Our focus is on all aspects of student learning, with an emphasis on growth.”

I guess Rykdal sees some growth - I think the scores look stagnant.  But for a new test for science, those are good scores.   

Please note: to see Seattle Schools scores - both district and by school - you need to use the drop-down menu to get to Seattle and there will then be a drop-down menu for each school.

3 comments:

Anonymous said...

And then there's this article I've seen floating around the internet... https://www.apmreports.org/story/2018/09/10/hard-words-why-american-kids-arent-being-taught-to-read

We know (most) people aren't making meaningful progress in closing the opportunity gap. Yet I look at the first few years my kids have spent in public school and I've seen very little actual literacy teaching. I have seen lots of the "balanced literacy" kind of teaching referenced in the article above and know a lot of parents supplementing at home and doing private tutoring. The opportunity gap would be difficult enough to close given the known vocabulary gap going into school, however if parents have to heavily supplement school based instruction, it seems hopeless.

NE Parent

Anonymous said...

If the state is still using long story problems to teach math, then that is probably behind the lousy math scores. This approach is very confusing for many students who do better with direct instruction. Students fail to gain proficiency, which we can see with declining scores from 3rd to 10th grade. The longer students are exposed to reform math, the worse they do.

S parent

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