Disqus

Friday, September 28, 2012

Stay in School

Seattle Public Schools is exploring new ways to support our students to stay in school and is asking families to join District staff in discussions regarding student truancy, suspension and discipline. The meetings will be held Oct. 4, 8, 11, 17 and 24 at several high schools around the region.

The meetings are being organized by the District Ombudsman, in collaboration with the Disciplinary Appeals/Truancy Office; and the office of School-Family Partnerships/Equity & Race.

The meetings will be held:
  • 5:30-7 p.m., Thursday, Oct. 4
    Rainier Beach High School, Library
    8815 Seward Park S.
  • 5:30-7 p.m., Monday, Oct. 8
    Cleveland - STEM, Room 1201
    5511 15th Ave. S.
  • 5:30-7 p.m., Thursday, Oct. 11
    Chief Sealth International High School, Library
    2600 S.W. Thistle St.
  • 5:30-7 p.m., Wednesday, Oct. 17
    Ingraham High School, Library
    1819 N. 135 St.
  • 5:30-7 p.m., Wednesday, Oct. 24
    Nathan Hale High School, Library
    10750 30th Ave. N.E.
For more information, contact the District Ombudsman at (206) 252-0529 or ombudsman@seattleschools.org.

You can download a flier here.

12 comments:

kellie said...

You know what is fascinating. The district should absolutely focus on the work of keeping students in school. It is important work and could be argued, it is the work of schools.

However, the enrollment projections are dependent on a drop out rate. If the drop out rate decreases in any meaningful way, there won't be room in any of the high schools for these students. That is one of the many reasons, why the projections bother me so much.

The high, medium and low scenarios are not useful. If the district is committed to this work, one of the enrollment "scenarios" should be a scenario in which all students progress to 12th grade. That would both make the drop out rate really visible and it would get the high schools to start planning for what the school would be if they were successful in retaining students.

Unknown said...

People should know that there are legal remedies for kids to help them stay in school. I am not sure that SPS will mention this at any of their forums, but TeamChild will provide free legal aid to kids who may be involved in the juvenile justice system or who are at risk for being involved in the juvenile justice system who are being denied their right to an education. The also can help with healthcare and housing as well as other supports to help them achieve positive outcomes in their lives. Here is a link: Teamchild

Jet City mom said...

If they want community participation, don't the meetings seem a little early?

Maureen said...

I emailed the ombudsman to ask if it would be appropriate for parents whose kids are not struggling to attend these meetings to see what they can do to help their school communities increase their graduation rates. I'll let you know if I hear back (or maybe someone from SPS could address that here.)

Maureen said...

Off topic, but relates to Kellie's post: Does SPS factor the Running Start participation rate into its capacity forecasts? Also, I wonder if Running Start participation decreased last year when more fees were (as I understand it) passed on to families?

dan dempsey said...

To keep struggling students in school "Effective Interventions" are needed. {{The district has preferred Social Promotion instead of effective interventions}}

These interventions need to begin in the primary grades.

Unfortunately we are likely entering into the Common Core State Standards "one size fits all" era.

It has been said : There will be no time for interventions .. 'cause we are doing Common Core.

dan dempsey said...

To keep struggling students in school "Effective Interventions" are needed. {{The district has preferred Social Promotion instead of effective interventions}}

These interventions need to begin in the primary grades.

Unfortunately we are likely entering into the Common Core State Standards "one size fits all" era.

It has been said : There will be no time for interventions .. 'cause we are doing Common Core.

cj said...

Maureen - Just to clear up any misinformation out there -- Running Start fees are not being passed on to families. Only if a student exceeds their allotted 1.2 state FTE does the family have to pay the excess, which only seems fair. So a student can still take 15 credits, or full time community college, and full tuition is still paid by the state. The student continues to pay only books and fees, just as always.

Maureen said...

Thanks cj! I clearly misunderstood what I had heard.

Dorothy Neville said...

To add onto Kellie's information, not only is capacity in a building calculated with a drop-out rate in mind, the state budget is as well. Washington pays school districts monthly, based on actual enrollment. So payments in the Spring are lower than payments in the Fall, reflecting the students who have dropped out.

If one medium sized district, such as Everett, comes up with a strategy to keep kids in school longer, they get a financial reward to pay for it. But if every district all of a sudden lowered its drop-out rate, the state would find themselves in a budget shortfall in the Spring. What would they do? Find the money elsewhere or do what they've done recently and make mid-year cuts to education?

Anonymous said...

Right, the more that drop out, or go private - the better.

-parent

Anonymous said...

The meeting should take 5 minutes - long enough to pass out Everett's playbook & adjourn.

ESD's Soaring Graduation Rate

Graduation Rates All in the Math.

WSDWG