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Monday, November 12, 2012

Finnish Ed Leader In Seattle

From the Times:

Pasi Sahlberg, who heads the Centre for International Mobility and Cooperation in Finland’s Ministry of Education and Culture, will be in Seattle this week to talk about how his country achieved its success without standardized tests, teacher merit pay, school choice, or many of the other trends in American public education.

Sahlberg, who started his career as a teacher, has written a book about that subject, titled “Finnish Lessons.”

Sahlberg will speak at a luncheon Wednesday at the Rainier Club at 820 Fourth Ave.  The luncheon starts at 11:45 a.m., costs $27 and requires an RSVP.  He also will give a free public lecture at  7 p.m. Wednesday at the University of Washington’s Kane Hall,  Room 210.

5 comments:

Anonymous said...

From the article below: "Since the 1980s, the main driver of Finnish education policy has been the idea that every child should have exactly the same opportunity to learn, regardless of family background, income, or geographic location. Education has been seen first and foremost not as a way to produce star performers, but as an instrument to even out social inequality."

http://www.theatlantic.com/national/archive/2011/12/what-americans-keep-ignoring-about-finlands-school-success/250564/

- Another POV

Unknown said...
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Anonymous said...

Ok, how does Finland support students with disabilities? What does that "every student" rhetoric amount to in practice?

I'd love a response if anybody attends the public events and these topics are raised (notably, they seldom are).

curious

Anonymous said...

Special Needs students in IFinland: http://www.european-agency.org/country-information/finland/national-overview/special-needs-education-within-the-education-system

CT

Anonymous said...

And
http://www.aft.org/pdfs/americaneducator/spring2012/Sahlberg.pdf

CT