Friday, April 11, 2008

Education Reform Talk

This from the League for Education Voters:

Hear one of our country’s leading education reform advocates, Kati Haycock, President of The Education Trust.

Mark this important conversation with Kati Haycock on your calendars:

Monday, April 28 at 7:00 - 8:30 PM
Seattle Public Library
No cost, but please RSVP to let us know you will attend.

Kati Haycock carries a message of urgency, change and hope that the League of Education Voters Foundation will embrace as we embark on a new campaign to promote and support bold education reform solutions.

1 comment:

dan dempsey said...

FYI---

The League of Education Voters is putting on an interesting town hall event in Seattle. They are bringing in Katie Haycock, President of the Education Trust, a foundation that is working towards closing the achievement gap by putting in place higher goals, and higher expectations. She is really worth the time and effort to go hear speak.

The following is just one of the areas she will be talking about: "Students most likely to opt out of algebra when it is not required are those whose parents are least engaged in their children's education. The result is an education system that magnifies inequities and perpetuates socioeconomic differences from one generation to the next." (Haycock, 2007)

Hope to see you there!

Kelly Munn

--------------------------

I have some disagreement with aspects of the above as written.

Higher expectations without effective interventions and a greatly improved support system will only increase the drop out rate.

The use of alarmingly poor materials in math not just in Seattle but statewide assures that those students with less access to outside school math help will have a very difficult time succeeding.

Look at how much difficulty most students have succeeding in math. NOTE: I did not say passing classes or getting good grades the proof is in the pudding. WA state k-12 education has provided us the lowest graduation rate from four year colleges in the nation. No wonder so many high tech companies bring employees in from elsewhere.

This could be an interesting Monday Night.

Dan