Tuesday, September 20, 2016

Tuesday Open Thread

A bit late; I was covering the Loyal Heights protest which I'll have in a separate thread.


The district is looking for members for the Equity and Race Advisory Committee.  This is not in their news page but I saw it in a tweet today.  Oddly, it was first put out in August with a September 9th cutoff but that they are tweeting it out may mean something changed.  I'll let you know.

There seems to be no end to the comments on the Black Lives Matter shirts that John Muir teachers wore last week at a welcoming event for students as well as the news that the Garfield football team knelt during the national anthem.  Director Geary reports this comment sent to her about the team:
Makes me sick to think I put my life on the line for these useless N******S (both white and black). I hope that your football team of monkeys experience many injuries this year so they may know how the many military members who lost life and limb for these worthless POS feel.
Wishing you all the worst!
This person is talking about children.  Sickening.  And naturally, it flies in the face of our First Amendment.

Good article on why third grade is so crucial.  I just attended my high school reunion in Arizona and apparently if third graders don't pass their state test, they are held back. 

What's on your mind?

61 comments:

Anonymous said...

After over 3 years of extensive advocacy by the community, including the formation of a Cedar Park Race and Equity Task Force which met over the summer, SPS staff are now recommending a change to the Cedar Park attendance area boundary. The amended boundary would allow John Rogers keep everything south of NE 125th Street. This should lower Cedar Park's enrollment (the building was projected to be over-enrolled), and it addresses some safety concerns, as kids living south of NE 125th will not have to cross this dangerous arterial in order to walk to school.

Unfortunately, the recommended amendment does nothing to address the potential for Cedar Park to become a very high-poverty school while neighboring schools become less diverse.

Here are some stats:

First, the Cedar Park projected numbers from the current, board-approved boundaries for 2017-18:

38.6% English language learners (ELL)
65.3% free/reduced lunch (FRL)
72.2% historically underserved

Then, the projected Cedar Park numbers for the proposed amendment.

43.8% English language learners (ELL)
69.0% free/reduced lunch (FRL)
76.2% historically underserved

IMO, the actual percentage of FRL at Cedar Park could be much higher, if non-FRL families in the Cedar Park attendance area chose to go elsewhere.

For more details, see this blog post from the Olympic Hills PTA: http://olympichillspta.org/2016/09/20/cedar-park-racial-equity/

North-end Mom

Anonymous said...

Anyone else upset about the early release time for high school sports? West Seattle is trying to do something about it. http://westseattleblog.com/2016/09/transportation-consternation-west-seattle-hs-booster-club-says-athletes-now-forced-to-miss-too-many-classes/

yumpears

Eric B said...

Minor pet peeve. The First Amendment says that the government can't punish you for speech or association. It doesn't say that people can't say they don't like something you said or did. It likewise protects the racist jerk who sent Geary the email from prosecution, but not from us calling him a racist jerk.

Anonymous said...

What is up with that www.principaltedhoward.com website, and what the heck is the "The Garfield Community Project" (trademarked!)? Is this a (future) commercial venture? Is he working on this as part of his job? Are the podcasts and videos shot at school, with school equipment? What's up with the personal email address--are communications secure, and the emails subject to public disclosure, as they should be?

Is this sort of thing really allowed? It all seems

Very Odd

Melissa Westbrook said...

Sure Eric, I agree. But the guy who sent Geary that e-mail probably didn't even sign his name so we could all call him out as he is calling out the Garfield players.

Melissa Westbrook said...

Very Odd, I finally checked out Howard's website. That IS odd and I just wrote the Board about it. I see some problematic issues with it and I think someone needs to be clear on what he can and can't say and do outside the realm of SPS. For example, these announcements that he says people can sign up for via e-mail? Is all that covered under public disclosure or not?

And yes, that video appears to be shot at Garfield. Who paid for that?

Principal Howard works hard and cares deeply but there have been several very problematic things that happened under his watch and yet it seems like he has very little oversight.

Anonymous said...

What is going to take place during the upcoming community meetings on boundary changes? I am specifically very concerned that grandfathering is not offered to most children. Without grandfathering, my child will be forced to change schools for 2nd grade and the set back that I anticipate from the disruption and adjustment makes me sick. I went to Director Pinkham's community meeting last Saturday and he sounded supportive of grandfathering for Viewlands 1st-3rd graders, as he stated that stability of remaining in their school community is very important for the younger ones. (The current proposal is to only grandfather 4th and 5th graders at Viewlands.) I am wondering if after these meetings, input will be considered? Or is this just a road show to tell people what has already been decided?

Tee

Anonymous said...

Generally community meetings haven't changed the plan of action much in the past. The staff already knows everyone wants to be grandfathered. Its also pretty much impossible for the entire plan to work if that was the case given how tight space is. So I'd say go since you never know, your input might be significant. What has been more effective is lobbying school board members. So I'd think about that as well.

-BeenThere

kellie said...


There are two problems with the boundary changes.

1) The boundary changes were based on 2012 enrollment data. Things have changed significantly and there are serious questions about whether or not the boundary changes even make sense in the first place.

For example the plans are based on alleviating the crowding at Broadview Thompson. However BT has some of the lowest class sizes in the area. There is no need to change that boundary and therefore a whole bunch of the subsequent changes also are NOT necessary.

2) Even if the changes were necessary, grandfathering is a viable option. OV is the lynchpin of the student grandfathering issue and OV can take a significant number of portables if required.

If OV took a few portables, you would be able to grandfather everyone. You could determine the number of portables after open enrollment.

As the geo-split are primarily impacting the FRL community, IMHO, a few portables are more than appropriate to protect this community from this level of disruption.

Anonymous said...

Kellie,
If Broadview Thompson has some of the lowest class sizes in the area, why do they not allow grandfathering for kids at that school? At least for 1st-5th grade? I am so not getting the reasoning behind these decisions that the district seems so reluctant to be flexible on.
"Elementary School Change Area 18
2016-17 elementary attendance area: Broadview-Thomson K-8
2017-18 elementary attendance area: Viewlands
Staff recommendation on grandfathering: No grandfathering
Reason: Capacity constraints"

It seems like if that were the done then grandfathering at Viewlands would not be as much of an issue?
"Elementary School Change Area 117
2016-17 elementary attendance area: Viewlands
2017-18 elementary attendance area: Olympic View
Staff recommendation on grandfathering: 4th and 5th grade only
Reason: Relieve Olympic View"

I imagine that most families (if they are even aware of the upcoming change) want their kids to remain at their originally assigned school. This is a huge mess.

Tee

kellie said...

@ Tee,

I really can't answer on behalf of the district because I don't understand either.

What I do understand is that it takes space for the dominos to fall. They are making enough changes that there is not any space for the inevitable "swirl" that happens when there is grandfathering.

However, adding a few portables would add that space for the dominos to fall.


Anonymous said...

I'm interested in the sports issue-- I have a new 9th grader in high school and I was quite surprised when he had to leave school at 1 pm for a late afternoon event very close by due to the district bus schedule-- so they get to the track and just hang out for a few hours. I like the comment by the west seattle poster pointing out that it is not ok to take a child out of school for a family event, but a child can miss multiple periods all year for sports. It is very odd.

- attendance matters

Lynn said...

Maybe they should be riding Metro.

Anonymous said...

North end Mom

This is a new term for me. Can you elaborate? Thanks.

72.2% historically underserved

just curious

Melissa Westbrook said...

I will just gently point out that the reason for the change in high school schedules is for better academic outcomes. Everything else can follow after that. I know sports are important but there is a priority here.

Anonymous said...

The school schedule change was pushed through by a very vocal crowd, with little analysis of unintended consequences. At 7:15, as I drive my child to a new zero period class (starting BEFORE last year's start time...) there are many young students waiting for buses. It won't be long before they are waiting in the dark. Day care costs have increased for families. My child, who can barely function after 9 PM, is being forced to stay up later to get homework completed (not all teenagers are night owls). Sports (which, when it comes to health, are arguably just as important as sleep, and provide incentive for students to maintain good grades), now require missing more class time to get to after school events. Practice starts later and ends later, which means the evening routine is pushed later.

The reason for the change was the POSSIBILITY of better student outcomes. There is absolutely no guarantee of better outcomes, and the impact on elementary students is really unknown at this point. I can tell you my older children are now flat out tired when they get home from school. They are not getting more sleep, and it's harder to keep up with the homework load.

-liked 7:50

Lynn said...

It sounds like the zero period class is the problem. Why is your child taking it? I hope that schools aren't making scheduling choices that undermine the benefits of the later start time.

I would be surprised to see research that supports the claim that organized competitive team sports are necessary for good health.

Anonymous said...

Liked 7:50, the bell time change isn't for "better student outcomes." It's for teen health. Teens have a dip in circadian rhythm between 3:00 and 7:00 am (adults have this dip between 2:00 & 4:00 am). This dip occurs even if they are "morning people." The morning dip can be even longer if they are sleep-deprived. There's also plenty of data to suggest teen sleep deprivation leads to bad things like car accidents, anxiety and even suicide.

"for teens the strongest circadian “dips” tend to occur between 3:00-7:00 am and 2:00-5:00 pm, but the morning dip (3:00-7:00 am) can be even longer if teens haven’t had enough sleep, and can even last until 9:00 or 10:00 am."
https://sleepfoundation.org/sleep-topics/sleep-drive-and-your-body-clock

"Sleep deprivation increases the likelihood teens will suffer myriad negative consequences, including an inability to concentrate, poor grades, drowsy-driving incidents, anxiety, depression, thoughts of suicide and even suicide attempts."
https://med.stanford.edu/news/all-news/2015/10/among-teens-sleep-deprivation-an-epidemic.html

like 8:45

Melissa Westbrook said...

"The school schedule change was pushed through by a very vocal crowd, with little analysis of unintended consequences."

Yes, they were vocal but nothing stopped anyone else from organizing against it. And no one really did. As for unintended consequences, I disagree. Many of the outcomes were discussed and the bottom line was academic outcomes are the most important. Go back and look at the taskforce's work.

There are no guarantees of anything in life but yes, the research shows better academic outcomes for later start high schools (plus, in one study, fewer car accidents by teens who drive.)

Anonymous said...

Lynn, I don't think it would be hard to find ample support for organized sports (not all high school sports are super competitive, the key word is organized), for both physical and mental health. Sports can enhance brain development, improve IQ, provide structure, teach life skills, and so on. Participating through school is the best and only option for some students.

"Necessary" for good health? That's a higher standard, and many studies, including those for later start times, will not speak in such absolutes. I read some of the studies used to support the bell time change, and you know what? Some were based on moving from a 7:00 start to a 7:30 start (uh, SPS still started later). Studies about possible negative impacts of early starts for elementary students did not seem to be considered. Impacts on day care costs and options? And how many SPS students actually drive to school? Seriously? Most students walk, get driven by parents, or use district provided or public transit, and the safety issues are around safe routes to school.

Way back when, we had a two-tier transportation system. Middle school/high school started around 8 and elementary started around 9. It worked.

I am tired of "wishful thinking" solutions to improve academics (the 3x5 schedule proposal, for example, is full of wishful thinking). SPS needs to actually improve academics. My child's high school science text is from 1993. The district tried to subvert it's own adoption process for elementary math materials and now they are delaying a middle school adoption (CMP needs to go). Readers and Writers Workshop in middle school? They need an actual writing curriculum. I could go on.

If mental health is truly a concern of SPS, then they should have counselors in every school.

-liked 7:50

Chris S. said...

Thank you like 8:45. My tween has been challenging me about the science. Following the links, the observation is very old (1980.) But, it is hard to separate biology from environment and culture. Here's another reference:
http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/26545246

Summary
Many schools have instituted later morning start times to improve sleep, academic, and other outcomes in response to the mismatch between youth circadian rhythms and early morning start times. However, there has been no systematic synthesis of the evidence on the effects of this practice. To examine the impact of delayed school start time on students' sleep, health, and academic outcomes, electronic databases were systematically searched and data were extracted using the preferred reporting items for systematic reviews and meta-analyses (PRISMA) guidelines. Six studies satisfied selection criteria and used pre-post, no control (n = 3), randomized controlled trial (n = 2), and quasi-experimental (n = 1) designs. School start times were delayed 25–60 min, and correspondingly, total sleep time increased from 25 to 77 min per weeknight. Some studies revealed reduced daytime sleepiness, depression, caffeine use, tardiness to class, and trouble staying awake. Overall, the evidence supports recent non-experimental study findings and calls for policy that advocates for delayed school start time to improve sleep. This presents a potential long-term solution to chronic sleep restriction during adolescence. However, there is a need for rigorous randomized study designs and reporting of consistent outcomes, including objective sleep measures and consistent measures of health and academic performance.

Melissa Westbrook said...

Liked 7:50, those are good points you made. I agree there are many other issues that need to be address.

Anonymous said...

As a high school teacher (and mom to elementary school kids), I will say that, so far, the later start time has been hugely beneficial. Yes, sports are a challenge, but that is a choice that students make and must learn to adjust to the new times. Anecdotally, I am hearing students say they are going to bed at the same time, but getting more sleep. -TeacherMom

Anonymous said...

The early departure from school in the afternoon for sports events is sometimes related to field availability (competing for field time) but also the lack of buses available. My cross country runner left school last week at 1:00 for a meet that didn't start until 4:00. The kids sat in the park and goofed off (I mean, warmed up). The coach encourated all the parents to write SPS transportation. Get some buses for real! This is ridiculous!

-Fedmomof2

Anonymous said...

Just curious where all the vocal supporters who claimed to not forget about the 11 Tier 3 schools, and help push for a 2 Tier system? Those families and kids are going to pay an even greater price when 20 minutes is added to the school day next year. Is it okay for elementary school children to have zero daylight hours after school in the winter months, and/or be stuck on buses even longer due to the evening rush hour? With such late dismissal times, it is difficult/impossible to schedule any necessary appointments, therapy etc, so now students are missing more school to fit those necessary appointments in. Maybe those Tier 3 families should have "before school" play dates, and "before school" enrichment classes? Another classic example of SPS...
-Divide and Conquer

Anonymous said...

Was there ever any consensus on whether the 3 tier busing system was saving money or not and how much if it was?

-Deficits


Melissa Westbrook said...

Deficits, the district always says any transportation changes will save money and never show proof it did or, if it did, where that savings went.

Eric B said...

If you're interested in 2-tier transportation (and really, who isn't!?), I have heard it is under consideration by SPS. Now would be an excellent time to advocate for that to both the Board and to Pegi McEvoy.

Anonymous said...

A thorough cost benefit analysis for a Cascadia split has not been presented, to my knowledge. There was a request for pros and cons, but I would expect more.

Total Chaos

Jan said...

Two thanks: First, thanks to Melissa on the heads up about the vile email to board directors. Caused me to pause in my day and send an email to them telling them how proud I was of Garfield's kids -- and how often those kids seem to get it "right" when it comes to finding a common public voice on current issues.

--Divide and conquer -- thanks for the reminder that the tier thing is still only partly done. My kids are no longer in high school, but I would love to know if there is any sort of organized group out there advocating for further changes to the bus schedule so that we don't address the health needs of just "some" kids -- but of all of them. Having gone through much of my life sleep deprived, I am a big believer now in the physical and mental health benefits of sufficient sleep. I would love to know if this is being addressed in any "big group" way -- or only by individually affected families / schools.

Jan

Anonymous said...

The issues with 2 tier transportation are pretty clear cut - primarily, it takes more drivers. Right now, the contractor can get away with paying drivers less and not offering health insurance etc - with 2 tiers and more hours per driver, those costs do go up. Also, there are challenges with getting enough drivers (there's a shortage all the time, even with 3 tiers). One reason for that is that many drivers sign on to work for SPS as a "training ground" then jump ship to go work for Metro where better hours & pay are offered.

Also right now, in the 3 tier system, 1 bus does maybe 3 to 4 schools. That's not possible in a 2 tier system - again, you not only need more drivers but you need twice as many busses. This is actually the "scam" involved in cost savings claimed in the 3 tier system - it has always been dependent on making the carrier do more with less.

Its all entirely doable, but there are costs involved.

reader47

Anonymous said...

When I taught elemtary sped in Texas, elementary schools started between 7:30-7:45. High schools started at 8:30ish. This was standard throughout the metro area where I lived. It worked well from a lot of perspectives. Change is hard. However, the state funded a longer school day (including all day K and all day PK for FRL and ELL) and we didn't release until close to 3pm. Generally districts used a 2-tier system - seems like that would make the most sense for Seattle over the long term.
-waterlogged

Anonymous said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Anonymous said...

We aren't enjoying the new Tier 2 high school times either. The earlier times worked much better for us because we avoided all the morning commute traffic after dropping our kid at the bus stop. Now, it is more chaotic. And because humans adjust their sleep cycles later with greater ease than earlier - it is no easier getting up at 6:30am than it was at 5:30am. We have just flipped the clock - we aren't getting more sleep - another hour has not been added to the day. But more time lost in traffic snarls.

Frankly, I am a little confused why people think this provides more sleep. We all just went to bed earlier (9pm, yes, 9pm) for the earlier times.

-SPSParent

Anonymous said...

@ just curious (from way up the thread)

"Historically underserved" (students) was language taken from the Race and Equity analysis of the Cedar Park attendance area boundaries.

It took some digging, but I think it refers to students who identify as Black, American Indian, Hispanic, or Pacific Islander.

-North-end Mom

kellie said...

It is important to remember that the three tier system was predicted to save $4m. It didn't. Only about $1m.

However it is predicted to cost $11m to go back. That is not possible.

The reason for the discrepancy is that the three tier system removed all of the "home grown" efficiencies that was built into the old two tier system. In the old system option schools shared busses. Schools that were geographically close shared busses with a 10 minute staggered times. And other innovations.

Anonymous said...

Anonymous above said
"I'm at a Tier 3 school and it sucks. After school activities that my child can attend are significantly limited because most of the elementary schools are Tier 1. Also, my child is exhausted when they come home from school. They still get up early, but just hang around until school finally starts. I sure am glad for the rest of you who are really enjoying your new times that would not be possible without screwing us over. Thanks everyone for the all for one and one for all togetherness. You got yours and the hell with the rest of us"

You do know that there were many many elementary schools at Tier 3 for many years that were switched to Tier 1 that didn't want to be on Tier 1? This wasn't an elementary school effort designed to "screw over" a few other elementary schools. I preferred our old Tier 3 for my elementary kid because he could take language classes in the morning and other "fun" stuff after school. Now we have to choose and those choices are limited as well in Tier 1.

BUT - I do have a high school student and the later start time is much better for that age. I'll take the trade off in elementary inconvenience for HS benefit. More sleep, happier moods, etc.

QA Parent

Anonymous said...

Frankly, the change from 2 tiers to 3 was a game played by the then head of Transportation. Everyone who worked under that person knew it was a game that could never produce the results promised. Most realized quickly that it was only going to look good on paper, but be problematic in reality.

I suspect a lot of what happens at SPS that claims to "save money" is a very similar game. I only know for sure this particular game was always a bad decision and it may well take more to undo it than we'd like. That's partly because the cost of more buses, (without which 2 tiers is impossible to achieve), has gone up quite a bit in last few years. There were also multiple carriers back then. Now it's a monopoly with a serious driver shortage.

So while the $11m is probably overkill, it's also probably not terribly far off either.

reader47

Anonymous said...

If there is "more sleep" with the later start, I have to wonder what students were doing with their time under the earlier start. There are still 24 hours in the day and class/activities/HW presumably still take the same amount of time. My child is more tired with the later start, but is trying to adjust and get an hour of school work done in the morning (a big thank you to all of the teachers that provide a weekly list of assignments so students can plan their time and work ahead).

-early birds

Lynn said...

I've been looking at the results of last spring's school climate surveys.

Garfield's staff survey reveals that just 37% responded favorably to questions on the school's instructional practices (down 10 points from the prior year.)

Here are most of the results:

Staff at this school share a common understanding of instructional best practices. 44% agreed (This sheds some light on the veracity of the claims that the staff are unanimous in agreement on the decision to drop honors classes.)

I receive the support I need to differentiate and modify instruction for my students. 39% agreed

I have access to strategies and materials to support all learners in my classes. 34%

This school has a consistent process for identifying students who struggle academically. 44%

This school implements a clear plan of action when a student struggles academically. 20%

I receive the support I need to address student behavior and discipline problems. 32%

The professional culture looks a little better except for:

This school has an effective process for making group decisions and solving problems 25%

and

Conflict among staff is resolved in a timely and effective manner. 29%

FamilyTime said...

Our household, for one, is immensely grateful for the later start for high school. Yes, it has pushed sports later and being forced to miss afternoon classes to accommodate bus schedules for cross-country meets is a problem, but the huge upside is that my kids are much more functional in the morning. I can really see the difference in how awake they are when they head out the door and I'm sure their first period teachers appreciate that. They simply weren't able to function well when they had to get up at 6am to get to school because even if they aren't up late with homework, they just don't fall asleep until late at night. It remains to be seen whether they'll be up later with homework with practices ending an hour later than last year. I'd appreciate it if RHS would address the amount of homework next!

—FamilyTime

Melissa Westbrook said...

Lynn, yes, I sent a recent e-mail to the Board about Mr. Howard and his personal website, just asking if this was the new direction for principals in SPS. Your review of the Garfield staff survey plus the fact that several troubling incidents have happened on his watch and yet he seems quite in control of his school make me wonder about what life is really like for staff at Garfield.

Anonymous said...

Thanks for reposting my comment QA Parent.
I do know that some elementary schools wanted to be late and some wanted to be early. But by isolating us in Tier 3, we end up with the burden of kids (and teachers) who don't fit into the right time for community after-school activities or trainings. We should all be at the same time..early, late, or perhaps a reasonable time for elementary school like 8:30 or 9:00.

I thought it back when it was decided and I still feel the same way. 9:35 is too late to start elementary school, especially when it gets out at 3:45 and even later next year. I'm also a teacher at a Tier 3 school. The late time definitely impacts the younger kids. I think it is fine for high school to start late, but why do we have to sacrifice the younger kids. It's not right.
Fed Up

kellie said...

@ reader 47,

There is no way the costs could possible be that much.

Despite enrollment growing ever year both the total number of students and the percentage of student receiving transportation has declined. The assignment system has radically changed the need for busses.

Additionally, the City of Seattle has stepped in and is now funding a healthy percentage of ORCA cards.

seattle citizen said...

I rarely click on the comments in media, but I was curious about the comments that the Garfield team kneeling might attract. I know that comments in media are often just mean and nasty but
a) the focus on "etiquette" of the anthem as opposed to discussion about the actual issues being protested was disheartening; and
b) the vitriol and hate directed at these teens was disgusting and heartbreaking. What have we become?

Anonymous said...

Oh Kellie - I totally agree - the numbers are inaccurate, and once again, all part of the original game. It was a poorly designed plan in the first place that all the line staff knew was going to bring all kinds of problems. And given changes, the odds are, the change back amount is equally inaccurate

reader47

Anonymous said...

Garfield High seems to attract more than its share of problems, some deserving and some not so. It holds a special status since it became the poster child for race relations in Seattle. It seems tensions are very high there with some students worried they will be targeted for their views or skin color. Lets hope for clam and sensibility in the face of troubling times.

BLMS

seattle citizen said...

Yes. Calm, sensibility, and action. Trouble has been here for 500 years; it's time to address it completely and put an end to the festering boils of racism.

Anonymous said...


High School Enrollment

Ballard High School 1,849
Chief Sealth International High School 1,120
Cleveland STEM High School 854
Franklin High School 1,260
Garfield High School 1,759
Ingraham International High School 1,346
Nathan Hale High School 1,180
Nova High School 331
Rainier Beach High School 700
Roosevelt High School 1,741
The Center School 230
West Seattle High School 997

Another Name said...

Activists are printing Black Lives Matter t- shirts for teachers. Has anyone developed an appropriate curriculum for K-2 students?

Anonymous said...

@Seattle Citizen--I don't know how to answer that question, but an introspective look here in Seattle is very much needed. My sister married an African American man and when they moved here two years ago I was excited for him to experience the feeling of living in our progressive and accepting city. It took him 3x as long as it should have to find a job, and recently while he was relaxing on a park bench listening to music while my sis was exercising, he was approached from behind by a rent a cop who said: "hey you bum, you loser, what are you doing here?! Shouldn't you be at work? You lazy punk" and when my brother in law didn't respond because his music was a bit loud and he said he really didn't think this man would be talking to him, the rent a cop walked right up and kicked him to get his attention.

This is NOT okay. My brother in law was very nervous and had to show him a pay stub to prove he is a productive member of society to this jerk.

Can you imagine not feeling safe listening to music on a park bench in the middle of the day because people might assume you're a bum because of the color of your skin? And even if you are a "bum" (what a horrible word)...why shouldn't you be able to sit in peace?

Back to your question...sadly, I don't know the answer but we can start with empathy and compassion. Start by understanding that my example story is happening here in Seattle to great people.

Skin Deep

Melissa Westbrook said...

Anonymous, next time give yourself a name.

High School Enrollment

Ballard High School 1,849
Chief Sealth International High School 1,120
Cleveland STEM High School 854
Franklin High School 1,260
Garfield High School 1,759
Ingraham International High School 1,346
Nathan Hale High School 1,180
Nova High School 331
Rainier Beach High School 700
Roosevelt High School 1,741
The Center School 230
West Seattle High School 997

I had seen these numbers and hope to put up all the numbers today. Ballard appears stuffed to the gills. The number at Hale seems low to me and I have wonder about that. Ditto on Cleveland. Is something being capped at those two schools? Those numbers in West Seattle, for both Sealth and West Seattle, also seem somewhat low.

Another Name, I have some questions into the district on your topic which I will write about in a separate thread when I get the answers. One interesting thing is that I cc'ed my questions to the Board. Director Blanford wrote to the Communications lead and asked for those answers to be sent to the directors. That is the first and only time that Blanford has ever acknowledged that he has read anything I have sent to directors. (And it wasn't even to me.)

Anonymous said...

Reposting for anonymous, and adding the numbers from Oct 2015, with % change.

High School Enrollment

Ballard High School 1,849 (1702, +9%)
Chief Sealth International High School 1,120 (1174, -5%)
Cleveland STEM High School 854 (842, +1%)
Franklin High School 1,260 (1308, -4%)
Garfield High School 1,759 (1714, +3%)
Ingraham International High School 1,346 (1235, +9%)
Nathan Hale High School 1,180 (1179, +0%)
Nova High School 331 (344, -4%)
Rainier Beach High School 700 (671, +4%)
Roosevelt High School 1,741 (1715, +2%)
The Center School 230 (270, -15%)
West Seattle High School 997 (994, +0%)

-another anon

Anonymous said...

It would be interesting to see these additional data points: ideal capacity, #part-time students having to take running start because they are pushed out, and #that fled to private/other districts

Total Chaos

Anonymous said...

" Anonymous Another Name said...

Activists are printing Black Lives Matter t- shirts for teachers. Has anyone developed an appropriate curriculum for K-2 students?"

If I see one teacher wearing one these shirts on the job...it's the end of me donating to the PTA fund. What they do one their own time is their business, but I oppose dragging our students into this narrative.

--Rose

Anonymous said...

Free Speech Rights of Public School Teachers in Washington State, from the ACLU:

https://aclu-wa.org/docs/free-speech-rights-public-school-teachers-washington-state

PTAs are not to be involved in political activity. "Activists" printing t-shirts could be anyone. I'd address concerns to the principal or school board if a teacher's political activity in the classroom is seen as disruptive.

-parent

Anonymous said...

Why should they address concerns to a third party when they can take a direct action? Cutting out the typical middle men bureaucracy and hitting them in the pocketbook is brilliant!

I'm cutting all donations to SPS, PTSA and any other related charities just over the mentioning of black lives matter and SPS. I recommended that other "privileged" ones do the same.

Unapologetic Privileged

Anonymous said...

@Unapologetic Privileged--I hope you're being sarcastic. These are kids we're talking about. Why take away from their experience because some adults are jerks?

Skin Deep

Anonymous said...

If only whites were black and knew what's it's like to be under the thumb.

That's why oppressors are afraid.

vine maple

Anonymous said...

I would respect my kids' teachers for taking political stands and talking about them with their students. It's better than apathy. And if I disagree with their views then that makes for a good conversation at home where my kids can hear both/many sides of these issues. We have a living civics lesson in front of us and I think it's brilliant. No one ever knew or discussed the third stanza of our National Anthem until Colin K. took a knee. -NP

Melissa Westbrook said...

"Why should they address concerns to a third party when they can take a direct action? Cutting out the typical middle men bureaucracy and hitting them in the pocketbook is brilliant!

I'm cutting all donations to SPS, PTSA and any other related charities just over the mentioning of black lives matter and SPS. I recommended that other "privileged" ones do the same.

Unapologetic Privileged"

I plan on writing about this upcoming event. I am trying to do some research so I fully understand who is doing what and what the district thinks.

Anyone can do whatever they want with charitable giving but it might be better to find out what teachers are doing and why before you cut off funds to your child's school. Or, you can contribute but direct that it only goes to certain items.

Of course teachers can have political views. And, if there is context within curriculum - history, civics, etc - certainly teach about it. But I do not agree that a teacher should be speaking out on political views to students especially younger ones who might not understand.

I am not sure how to classify Black Lives Matter. It seems more a movement like the civil rights movement, than a political group. So certainly, within a curriculum context, a teacher could talk about it.