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Wednesday, November 10, 2010

Journalism breaking out

It's heartening to see difficult questions getting asked.

4 comments:

ParentofThree said...

She needs handlers? What's next a security detail testing the soup before she sits down for lunch at Alliance for Ed events?

Such a inflated sense of self.

Patrick said...

Maybe some buglers to blow a fanfare for her whenever she enters a room.

Disgusted teacher in seattle said...

I guess no one's seen the protective security at School Board meetings?! She's the only one that more often than not stays on stage during breaks or slinks into the side room, both of which are guarded by a security guard. Tsk, tsk. Us "potentially violent Seattleites" who care about quality education for our students need to be kept at bay and in our place. (sarcasm here just in case someone misses it).

Eric M said...

I have been criticized for being negative on this blog, so I will say:

Bravo, Dr. Goodloe-Johnson. Appearing in public and subjecting yourself to potential criticism was a risky move, and shows that you are trying to connect with the public!

And Bravo, also, for bringing along some of your assistants so that you could provide the public with the best possible answers to their questions!

I think the State-of-the-District public meeting is a great idea, and should perhaps be a mandatory part of the job for every SPS Superintendent. I do suggest that it's crucial (in a nearly 1 billion-dollar-a-year annual enterprise) that each yearly meeting begin with a review of the important achievements and goals set out at the PREVIOUS meeting.

I'm not trying to be uppity, and suggest how the Superintendent should do her job. I'm sure she knows better than me, and has a lot on her plate already. I salute her and her staff for all of her efforts on behalf of our children!

Institutional memory is problematic for all human institutions, and Seattle Public Schools may (and I'm not criticizing here, just including SPS in all human institutions) possibly have just a few issues with institutional memory of past promises made and forgotten.

I mean, everyone forgets, but we do have to try to remember and honor what we promised, don't we?