Disqus

Wednesday, May 13, 2009

Education Trust Talk - What's Next for Public Education?

I had posted this information previously but received another e-mail about it and examined it more closely. The Education Trust is an interesting group. They are very much about closing the achievement gap with - seemingly - volumes of reports I should probably read (in my spare time). It might be an interesting talk.

You’re invited to a town hall meeting to hear Kati Haycock, president of The Education Trust, speak about the next steps for education advocates and join a robust conversation about the future of our public schools.

Monday, May 18th, 7 – 9 PM
Seattle Public Library
Microsoft Auditorium
1000 Fourth Avenue, Seattle, WA 98104
View your invitation to this event.

6 comments:

MathTeacher42 said...

Are ANY of their ideas costed out?

Do they estimate the time it takes to implement EACH idea:

per student per class,
OR
per students per class,

per classes per day,
per days per week,
per weeks in the year.

I do NOT have the time to see if this is just MORE of the silliness the legislature just passed - all our over educated over credentialed Wizards of Oz pulling the levers and blaring into the megaphone

AND PAYING FOR NOTHING.

I hope not.

Bob Murphy, sick of UNFUNDED Great Game Ideas.

Life's but a walking shadow,
a poor player
That struts and frets his hour upon the stage
And then is heard no more:
it is a tale
Told by an idiot,
full of sound and fury,
Signifying nothing.

dan dempsey said...

I went and heard Dr. Paul Ruiz ( of Ed Trust) speak about the achievement gap. This was at the WaMu center in Des Moines area. Rep. Sharon Tamiko Santos was present, she is great.

In math the curriculum (instructional materials ) are the problem. Unfortunately his talk was about everything but the Giant Math elephant in the room.

no matter where I go....
if it is pie in the sky reforms with more spending that gets written down..... but changing the continually under-performing substandard OSPI inspired instructional math materials NO NO that gets a free pass.

Dr James King of UW is the SPS guide. Under his design the IMP projects at Cleveland and Garfield mathematically disabled ELL students (free pass no one talks about this). Despite large infusions of NSF funding and UW assistance in developing professional communities etc.
Cleveland WASL scores plummeted.

Result free pass. It looks like the only way children classified as disadvantaged learners will get effective instructional materials in the SPS is when someone stands up in court and demands this discrimination stops.

Clearly the school board gang of "Four" were unable to hear RBHS's Glenda Madison & Michael Rice or Franklin's Bob Murphy. ...
... oh yeah achievement gap ..rhetorically they are all over it ..but when it comes to doing anything about it in math, best check the votes:

EDM 6-0 (Irene Stewart was gone)
CMP2 6 -1 (Soriano dissents)
Discovering Math 4-3
(dissent from DeBell, Martin-Morris, and Bass.)

What is next for Seattle in math? It is more discrimination for disadvantaged learners. -- due to the actions of Maier, Sundquist, Carr, and Bass.

Gouda said...

Kati is a no fuss, brass tacks, tell it like it is education advocate. She's always talking about data, and she doesn't talk about what can't be done. She's worked with schools around the country and the results have been amazing.

Her basic premise is simple (my words here): Kids can learn at the highest levels, regardless of circumstance, race, parent involvement, etc.

She is all about innovation in education, something I find quite lacking in SPS. I'm not sure why we're so scared to take risks in this District. It's not like the status quo is stellar.

Anyway, she doesn't fuss about. She is straight forward and gives practical solutions. She asks hard questions and demands accountability at every level.

When I first saw her, I thought "I'd hate to be a teacher or principal sitting in this room right now."

So definitely grab all of your teacher friends and go.

seattle citizen said...

I agree with Priya. I've heard Kati Haycock, also, and recommend her. Not that I agree with all she has to say, but she is very straightfoward, very "let's innovate and get this done."

Unknown said...

"When I first saw her, I thought "I'd hate to be a teacher or principal sitting in this room right now."
So definitely grab all of your teacher friends and go."
Wow. Just...wow.
So, why is it that only teachers are assumed to know nothing about teaching? What do you do, Priya? I'm guessing you're not a teacher.

dan dempsey said...

Priya said:
Her basic premise is simple (my words here): Kids can learn at the highest levels, regardless of circumstance, race, parent involvement, etc. Children are hardly uniform in background or capabilities or intellectual gifts.

These statements remind me of Jaime Escalante in the movie "Stand and Deliver" where he turns students in one of the worst high schools in the USA into Calculus stars in a very short time.

The reality is it took seven years and several improved feeder Junior High programs before Escalante taught his first AP Calculus class at Garfield HS in East LA.

I am growing exceptionally tired of the quick fix modifications (which are often unsound Ed. echool ideas)that rarely are continued long enough to produce results.