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Monday, May 25, 2009

Summer Camps

I'd like to start posting summer camp info especially for free/low-cost camps to get that info out there as we approach the end of the school year. Here's one.

Current sixth- and seventh-graders will have an opportunity this summer to learn how to design and program video games, build and race a car that runs entirely on solar energy, or learn how to make objects float. Cleveland High School will be hosting an “Eagle Tech” Camp from June 29 to July 16 for these and other technology and science subjects. Camps will be held from 9 a.m. to 2:30 p.m., Monday through Thursday. Technology classes include: DigiPen Project FUN, Project Lead the Way, and Pre-Engineering/Science. A selection of science classes include: Earth Science, Chemistry, Physics and Biology. Click here for the flier. For more information, contact Kelly Tagupa at 252-7814 or katagupa@seattleschools.org.

If you know about others, please let us know.

13 comments:

Ben Goldfarb said...

For kids interested in Ultimate Frisbee, Disc Northwest offers high quality day camps for middle and high school-ers. Scholarships are available.

For more information see

http://www.discnw.org/events/SeattleUltimateCamp.html

zb said...

Well the camp I've been mentioning is the one I heard about here:

http://www.cultural.org/wlp/camp.php

The Arabic, Urdu, and Persian language camps at Northgate through "ACE World language." I also hear that camps that normally filled up early might still be available this year (though that's probably more likely for the ones that are not free).

seattle citizen said...

sung to the tune of "Love the One You're With":

"There's a camp
In the Berkshire Hills,
And the food there
Surely kills
And if you can't get
Your kind of thrills,
Camper, leave the camp you're at;
Leave the camp you're at!"

Rick Zappa, counselor, Camp Sloane
(much to indignation of the assembled administrators at Parent's Day festivities who heard his rousing words)

SolvayGirl said...

I highly recommend WIlderness Awareness
http://www.wildernessawareness.org/youth/summer_camps.html

My daughter loved the sessions held at Seward Park.

Summer Day Camps
(ages 6 - 12) Our Summer Day Camps offer Nature Adventures for kids in Seattle, Bellevue, Kirkland and Carnation. We have expanded our schedule this year to accommodate the overwhelming demand for these camps!

Advanced Day Camps
(ages 10- 12). Advanced Nature Adventures in
Outdoor Survival Skills, Scout Awareness and more. These camps are perfect for students who have spent at least one week with us, and are ready for more!

zb said...

And, for those of you whose kids want to enjoy the water around here there's Sail Sand Point (at Magnuson):

http://www.sailsandpoint.org/?content=YouthSailing

The kids really learn to sail in these classes, and the classes are appropriate if your kids are independent and like being around water.

anonymous said...

Families can check the parks and rec website. They offer free sports camps to all during the summer. In the past they have offered volleyball, softball, sailing (at Greenlake), basketball, and many others. Sometimes they are announced late in the spring, so people miss out on them, so keep checking the website if you are interested.

They are open to all and very well run!

seattle citizen said...

North Cascades Institute, an incredibly beautiful facility on the shores of Diablo Lake constructed with "green" and sustainable technology, offers some youth programs. They also are actively looking to serve city youth: the facility is a joint operation including Seattle City Light.
http://www.ncascades.org/programs/youth/index.html?-session=nci_user:D8BA3FAD0cd8113A8Bvpo3D7A747

seattle citizen said...

Islandwood, on Bainbridge Island, also offers summer programs. My niece has done it a few times.

Islandwood was founded by the Brainerds, who started Adobe. They spent millions to build a facility on 255 acres on BI. It (also) is built green and sustainable: campers weigh their food and their scraps after lunch; the compost said scraps; bunkhouses are built of recyled materials; their solar power; the facility has a sewage bioremediation plant onsite, a pond with a raft that students pedal to move it about; a fine system of trails leading to Blakely Harbor; needless to say, they have an environmental focus. I'm not sure if they serve bug juice. A wonderful place! They, too, have an active outreach for city kids.
http://www.islandwood.org/summer-programs

amrines said...

Looks like the Eagle Tech camp at Cleveland is limited to 6th-7th PUBLIC school students. I don't really know how this is legal, but that is what I was just told. We were placed on a waiting list and will be offered a spot if space allows after the public school kids' applications are processed. I am tempted to sham-enroll my kid for next year today and reapply.

The purpose of the camps is to showcase/promote Cleveland High School. Of course, people with middle-school-age kids in private school might be a great target audience for this mission.

SolvayGirl said...

amrines said: "The purpose of the camps is to showcase/promote Cleveland High School. Of course, people with middle-school-age kids in private school might be a great target audience for this mission."

So true! I just don't understand why the District seems so unconcerned about the number of kids attending private school in Seattle. It really says to me that they don't care about trying to attract them back into the system.

seattle citizen said...

I wonder if Eagle Tech is funded by some federal program, addressed at low-income or public students....maybe that's why it's open first to public students, then to private?

Anonymous said...

I am a mom of a student in the Seattle public school system, an architect and am offering classes this summer titled "Architecture for Kids". These are week long, hands-on sessions where the students learn about our built environment while using their creativity to develop design solutions.

There are classes for students K2-12.

For more information, please visit my blog;http://archforkids.blogspot.com/

Judith said...

The University of Washington Libraries is hosting a Smithsonian Traveling Exhibit on the history of the Filipino American community, until July 26th: Singgalot: The Ties that Bind. We have a small community grant from the Smithsonian to pay for buses for Seattle area students to visit the exhibit. If you are involved in summer school activities with minority students, or dealing with issues of diverisity, or simply looking for an educational outing for a group of students, please contact us.

http://www.lib.washington.edu/ougl/singgalot/