Thursday, March 19, 2015

Superintendent Nyland's Words to Staff on SBAC

 Dear Staff,
> Some of you have expressed concern about the administration of the Smarter Balanced Assessment (SBA). Concerns have included questions about the utility of the assessment, the instructional time lost due to testing and the likelihood of lower test scores. I encourage you to visit our newly developed Frequently Asked Questions<http://smarterbalanced.www.seattleschools.org/modules/cms/pages.phtml?pageid=324018&> on our district website.

I would acknowledge that the SBA presents unique challenges – particularly in regard to this year’s test administration. Although the amount of SBA testing time for each individual student is relatively small (about eight hours depending on grade level), because of our limited technology, the administration of the test is spread out through much of the spring months.
>
> The SBA however, does take several steps in the right direction. It reflects the higher College and Career Readiness Standards (Common Core) which our students need to compete successfully in a global market for family wage jobs (75% of family wage jobs now require SOME college). Yes, the SBA does measure student progress against a higher standard and the percentage of students that achieve proficiency will likely be lower. We have seen similar trends with the WASL, the MSP, the HSPE, and the EoCs. In each case, we have learned from the test results and risen to the challenge. I am confident that we will do so again, and that the preparation work done in Washington and Seattle will mean that our state and district scores will continue to compare favorably. Seattle currently outperforms the state in Reading, Math, Science and Writing.

> I also take seriously my oath of office promising to uphold state and federal laws. The SBA is a state requirement and a part of both state and federal law. Since we are already a high risk grantee for Special Education, failure to give the SBA could further jeopardize our federal funds. Teacher and principal contracts, as well as state certification, also require adherence to state law.
>
> All employees responsible for administering the SBA are directed to give the SBA as required by law and/or their supervisor. I would also ask that staff give appropriate professional advice (rather than personal advice) to parents.


> SBA administration has begun for many of our schools and will begin soon for many more. I want to thank all of those who have worked so hard to prepare for these assessments – from student learning, to keyboarding, to technology, to the logistics of scheduling, and more.
> A note to those with personal/professional objections to administering the SBA:
>
> Staff who object to administering the SBA must give advanced notice to their supervisor and work with their supervisor to insure that arrangements are made for SBA administration and coverage. For those who give advanced notice, refusal to give the SBA will be considered as misconduct. 


Consequences will be determined after further consideration and review of the CBA. Failure to give advanced notice of your refusal to administer the SBA, will be considered as insubordination and flagrant misconduct, and it will result in the imposition of serious discipline, up to and including termination of your employment and a referral to OSPI to take action on your certificate.
>
> Finally, I want to restate my confidence in the teachers and students of Seattle. We live in challenging times. Each of us – superintendent, principal, teachers, and students – faces increased challenges in support of student learning. There is no question, we are each being asked to do what seems daunting. The challenge of our times is whether we face those challenges with a GROWTH mindset or a FIXED mindset. A fixed mindset says we are what we are and have no hope for future growth. A growth mindset says that we can each learn and grow through dedicated effort. Seattle has demonstrated that kind of growth mindset resulting in a steady increase in test scores. The growth over the past six years has been exemplary district-wide and includes more schools of distinction than any other district in Washington. We have that hope and aspiration for each of our students and each of us as colleagues and professionals.
> Thank you – each of you – for your part in making great things happen for each and every one of our students.

61 comments:

Meet Clara said...

SPS is promoting a video called: Meet Clara.

Clara is a third grader that will take SBAC. Very upbeat music and a lot of smiles.

Anonymous said...

Baloney on the approximately 8 hours of testing per child. My child spent two half days this past week testing. No classes until after lunch. Same next week. 16 wasted hours and the word is that more time will be needed.

Class schedules are out the window. No brainwork in the few hours available at school. Too much to handle on test weeks. No homework.

Teacher attitudes are resigned, sullen, angry, stoic.

At the class learning level SBAC is a steaming pile of poo.

Angry mother

Anonymous said...

Lame. Very sad to have to endure empty threats and spinelessness, just to go to work. Sort of the death knell of public ed. I guess that was probably the goal all along.

Empl

Anonymous said...

Has the district been using Common Core for at least a year or two? If not then what's the point of testing for these standards? I was going to let my kids take them because they don't mind tests at all and usually do well so it would help the teachers if the state is really going to be so moronic as to make students' scores part of teachers' eval. But the threats Mr Nyland is making to staff/teachers are making me angry. How about we fire HIM if these tests don't turn out well since clearly he's the DECIDER!
Can anyone tell me what happens to the teachers if we opt out? Will they be penalized on their evaluations for my kids not taking the tests?
Where did Mr Nyland gets his training? The Vlad School of Superintendent?

CCA

mirmac1 said...

Nothing will happen to the teachers. I urge a mass opt-out. Let the DECIDERs deal with it.

Kate said...

Yes, with Nyland's threats to teachers, parents really do need to take charge and opt out en masse.

Anonymous said...

Not a lot of empathy in this missive by Dr. Nyland (assuming he wrote it, which is actually likely as SPS is somewhat in between Communication Directors).

It is not what he said (Teachers, we gotta do this 'cuz of OSPI requires it & they fund SPS), it is HOW he said it. He is yanking the leash hard. But I guess what does he care, he only has 2 more years left, so it is not like he's a long term stakeholder.

I would have liked it if he could have passionately stated his belief as why THESE test are really great assessments that will help all of our children and spur instruction on to excellence.


Instead he says SPS is already on the ropes because they are badly failing Special Eductation children. Eeeew. He should not have mentioned that. Tying those two things together (SBACs must be written because SPS can't do SpEd properly) is gross, nonsensical, and rather sleazy for my tastes.

Sorry, Teachers. It is not you. It is not your fault.


Controlling how a teacher talks with a parent ("don't be personal, be professional!")? Rather an overreach. These teachers have our elementary-aged children for 8 hours a day, more than 100 days a year. That to me is a personal relationship. I'm not looking for cold or stand-offish, I want our children and me to be personally regarded. 'Cuz, you know, they're children... not furniture or tax returns or broken cars in need of repairs.

First-time Opted-Out

Anonymous said...

Is your child in elementary or middle school, @angry mother?
I wondered about class schedules...since the test will be given over several weeks as laptop carts cycle through classrooms, how are middle school schedules going to work? Is it going to be a month of shortened classes, meaning very little gets done? How is it being administered in each middle school?

opt out?

Anonymous said...

Wow. Just wow.

'Wow'

Anonymous said...

Seattle Schools outperform the state averages--a huge accomplishment for any urban school system--and the teachers should be lauded, especially because they do this in spite of the JSCEE crowd.

Condescendingly, Nyland turns around and tells these same teachers how to speak to parents, and then ends patting them on the head like, "Good dog. Good job."

This is the on the heels of Clover Codd testifying that state test scores should be used in teacher evaluations. She's the same windbag who told teachers that MAP should never be used to evaluate teachers--before she was hired to implement the Gates money to link test scores with teacher evaluations.

SPS teachers--wake up! Take control. Parents support you. This insult to injury is unnecessary and you are in a position to stand up to the disgraceful behavior by these spineless puppets.

--enough already

Anonymous said...

Seattle Schools outperform the state averages--a huge accomplishment for any urban school system

There are a lot of hard working teachers, but let's be honest. It's strongly correlated with parental income, and Seattle has a higher average family income compared to many other districts, plus it's the largest district in the state. Seattle is 40% FRL, compared to Spokane's 59% FRL (2nd largest district), and Tacoma's 65% FRL (3rd largest district).

I don't have a hard time with the Superintendent reminding teachers they need to be professional and adhere to their contractual obligations, as well as state and federal law. Will the rest of the administration be told the same (for matters other than state testing), and will there be follow through on the threat of "serious discipline...including termination?"

Anonymous said...

I beg to differ.

We keep hearing about the number of students who are in private schools in Seattle.

I'm not a mathematician! Correct me if I'm wrong. I'd actually like to see the statistics of students with similar demographics as Seattle in other cities and how they fare.
I certainly know that some areas that are in great need of improvement. I saw that first hand. African American boys come to mind immediately.

Let's face it, though. Since the demographics are in your favor, so are your teacher demographics. I never worked with such smart teachers as during my long stint in Seattle. On the other hand, I was continually and truly shocked by their lack of backbone when it came to union issues.

Don't throw your teachers under the bus, reader. You'd be crazy to do that.

You must be an APP parent. Just kidding!

--enough already

Banner said...

So disappointing. Nyland has handled this so badly. His first big test and he has failed miserably.

Here come the inevitable stories of conflict in the mainstream media which will only make both sides dig in deeper.

SBAC is a horrible, demeaning ordeal to put students through, but the law is on Nyland's side so teachers will lose this one (actually, students, parents and teachers lose this one).

But making threats and bullying just wasn't the way to handle this.

It never is.

Anonymous said...

From Nyland's letter:

"The challenge of our times is whether we face those challenges with a GROWTH mindset or a FIXED mindset. A fixed mindset says we are what we are and have no hope for future growth. A growth mindset says that we can each learn and grow through dedicated effort."

Just an FYI for those not associated with Nathan Hale HS. Growth Mindset -vs- Fixed Mindset is a central theme at Nathan Hale HS, as part of their 9th grade curriculum and beyond.

I can't help but wonder if that last paragraph was directed at Hale? Was it meant to somehow rationalize the taking of the SBAC as something that is somehow consistent with their core teaching at Hale?

Maybe it is all a big coincidence that he used that terminology, but, then again, maybe not?

Hale Parent

Anonymous said...

Growth mindset talk permeates the edu-world. Before that, it was "grit." Take it for what it is, the latest eduspeak.

skeptic

Watching said...

Nyland came down with an iron fist and threatened teacher's licenses- disgusting.

IMO, this is the second time in one week that Nyland showed a lack of good judgement. The first time Nyland showed a lack of judgement was when he testified in favor of linking teacher evaluations- an initiative that is NOT supported by the American Statistical Association.

I would have more respect for Nyland if he had acknowledged legitimate concerns of professional educators.

Nyland is being paid $300K per year for 3 years and he is our million dollar man. He is advocating for our children and he appears to be nothing more than a puppet on a stick.

Watching said...

I recently read a good article about Common Core being inappropriate for young children. The article made a good point: The words "high" and "low" achievement have replaced the word "developmentally appropriate".

Anonymous said...

Hail to Nathan Hale! I hope that they don't buckle after this patronizing and threatening letter. As a parent I feel patronized reading this letter. I cannot imagine how the teachers feel. If Hale ends up giving the test, I hope the classrooms for testing are empty. I spoke with a friend who lives outside Denver yesterday and the two 4th grade classrooms at her dauther's school taking the PARCC this week had 50% opt out rates.

-Fedmomof2

Anonymous said...

"and the child’s school will be penalized"

The words of a bully, or a mafia like threat, we won't hurt you, but we'll hurt your school.
Boo.

-NNNCr

Melissa Westbrook said...

Reprinting for Anonymous (please give yourself a name next time):

Seattle Schools outperform the state averages--a huge accomplishment for any urban school system

There are a lot of hard working teachers, but let's be honest. It's strongly correlated with parental income, and Seattle has a higher average family income compared to many other districts, plus it's the largest district in the state. Seattle is 40% FRL, compared to Spokane's 59% FRL (2nd largest district), and Tacoma's 65% FRL (3rd largest district).

I don't have a hard time with the Superintendent reminding teachers they need to be professional and adhere to their contractual obligations, as well as state and federal law. Will the rest of the administration be told the same (for matters other than state testing), and will there be follow through on the threat of "serious discipline...including termination?"

Hale Parent, I had noticed that phrasing but did not know Hale was using it. I was annoyed because it smacks of "status quo versus needed change" that you get from ed reformers. If you don't like the change suggested, then you MUST be for the status quo. It's a phony argument and I'm sad to see Nyland use it.

I also wish that if he wants to be a tough guy, that it will extend to those at JSCEE.

Anonymous said...

Wow. that is a very very depressing message. And I find the need to threaten teachers with loss of their teaching certificate complete over the line. Very disappointing.

Teachers - we appreciate you. We support you. Follow your own conscience and don't stand for such patronizing and downright disrespectful babble.

reader47

Idea said...

Let's have Nyland take the 11th grade SBAC and release HIS scores to the public.

Nyland is proposing that our children sit through eight hours of useless testing-- he should do the same.

What is good for the goose is good for the gander.

Anonymous said...

Nyland and Dorn should take some advice from David Coleman, architect of the Common Core. Save us the personal opinion. If teachers shouldn't disparage the test, then no cheerleading for the test, this isn't the movie Bring it on.

Like Joe Friday, just the facts. If the test is worth its salt is a matter of opinion. Zipping lips goes two ways.

-NNNCr

Lynn said...

Parents have the power to stop this. I hope opt-out numbers are high.

I can't imagine working for someone who treated me with this little respect.

Anonymous said...

So - I keep coming back to how disrespectful I find this email. Is there any value, beyond blowing off steam, in our writing the Board and expressing discontent?

I feel like no one is ever listening over there, very disheartened. But then there's also the whole "silence equals consent" theory of life.

thoughts?

reader47

Melissa Westbrook said...

Reader 47, that's a good point.

If this kind of message is given to teachers (and other staff) about speaking out, then it allows the district to say, "No, we have no real pushback from teachers."

And of course there isn't because the Superintendent made clear there is no room for discussion.

You may have missed it in my notes on this week's School Board meeting, but the SBAC will be part of the agenda at the April 3rd Curriculum and Instruction meeting.

Anonymous said...

Teachers should wear all black and duct tape over their mouths in protest of this further restriction on their right to think, speak, and act freely.
-speechless

Anonymous said...

Dear "opt out?"

My child is in elementary school. I don't care what the superintendent says about the test length. I was there both days and it was eight hours for only the first half of the test. It is a flat out lie that this is "only" eight hours of assessment. Go to your own school and look for yourself.


The loss of 16 or more hours to this one test plus the rest of the learning time around those tests being disrupted is ridiculous. What is the benefit of the test beyond fulfilling an apparent state order to take them? For two weeks of lost learning, precious little that I can see.

Private schools aren't taking two weeks of disruption to assess the under-age-12 students. Parochial schools aren't taking two weeks.

Angry mother
(who will not have her student take this test next year but who will still be angry about the loss of learning time)

Anonymous said...

Angry. Most schools are scheduling at least 2 months. You'll be losing WAY more than 2 weeks instruction by the time SBAC is over. In fact, once it starts, school's pretty much done.

Empl

Greenwoody said...

I'm so glad Sharon Peaslee acted quickly and over widespread public opposition to make this guy the permanent superintendent. She's expressed plenty of concern with standardized testing in the past, so she must be thrilled that her handpicked man is making these appalling threats.

Anonymous said...

Well, I went ahead and wrote the board. Fat lot of good it will do but since I do believe there is strong "silence equals consent" culture at HQ, what the heck. Made me feel better anyway ;)

reader47

Anonymous said...

Is there a live link to this letter anywhere?

tc

Solidarity parent said...

Well, stop the presses, everyone. Nyland's exact words were: "All employees responsible for administering the SBA are directed to give the SBA as required by law and/or their supervisor. I would also ask that staff give appropriate professional advice (rather than personal advice) to parents."

Nyland just asked teachers to give appropriate professional advice about the SBAC to parents. Teachers, we'd love to hear from you! Direct email to my personal inbox would be appreciated. In your professional opinion, what are the pros and the cons of my particular child taking the SBAC?

This is called working to rule.

Anonymous said...

Ms. Peaslee apparently thinks only the State and Federal legislature can change this situation. If we have a problem with this testing, we should take it up with them. SPS has to follow the law, don't you know. What a cop out. Quelle surprise

reader47

Anonymous said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Anonymous said...
This comment has been removed by a blog administrator.
Anonymous said...

https://www.facebook.com/groups/WAstateAgainstCommonCore/

Common Sense said...

Peaslee has been an out-spoken director. She has consistently spoken for the needs of special education students, against top-down initiatives and excessive testing.

Now, it is time for the board and Nyland tospeak-out about the impact that SBAC will have on special education students and ELL students.

SBAC is a state mandate, but there is nothing stopping the fore-mentioned individuals from representing their constituents and expressing their concerns. Will they?

S

Common Sense said...

"Ms. Peaslee apparently thinks only the State and Federal legislature can change this situation. If we have a problem with this testing, we should take it up with them."

Does Peaslee think the Board of Directors and Superintendent should take the issue to the state and feds?

Anonymous said...

Your kids will receive scores of 0 but in the past (not sure with these tests) it was noted that a student missed the exams so at least the 0 is explained. My youngest is a sophomore in college now and I opted her out throughout middle school after I started researching the WASL and how it was scored (the state scoring system is very messed up). She was a great tester so it wasn't a matter of thinking she wouldn't pass. Even back then, many of her teachers thanked me for opting her out. So it's been a long time since I've been involved with state testing and a lot could have changed.

It's my understanding that if at least 5% of students opt out the scores for that class will be considered invalid so hopefully a lot of students will opt out.

In my opinion, opting out is the only way to stop this. The tests drive everything and without the test scores, they can't grade students, teachers or schools.

Good luck on deciding whether to opt out or not.

Richard Reuther said...

True colors come out. Nyland has drunk the kool aid and the powers that be must be served. Screw the teachers; screw anybody who has a brain. The masters must be served with the jobs of teachers. Uphold the state and federal laws? This country was FOUNDED on people DISOBEYING stupid and unjust laws. Women's Suffrage was won by people DISOBEYING unjust laws. The Civil Rights movement was based on people DISOBEYING unjust laws. Nyland, you represent unjust laws. I think he's been backed into a corner and all he knows to do is to threaten. Not a very deep toolkit for dealing with intelligent people.

StringCheese said...

I believe the "fixed" mindset in this scenario is believing that you are powerless and that nothing you do can stop the wheels of the corporate testing machine so you might as well roll over and hold others down while you're at it.

A "growth" mindset would be examining SBAC, mandates, and questioning the "powers that be" when things simply don't add up.

Fixed = blindly following directions
Growth = thinking critically, questioning, and forming your own opinions.

Anonymous said...

Letter to families about SBAC says: "By now, your child’s school has shared the school’s assessment schedule with you."

No, they haven't.

-still waiting

Kirk Williamson said...

It has been many years since I had direct contact with Larry Nyland while he was working to heal a badly fractured school system. Reading his remarks--especially about his oath of office--I conclude that once again Superintendent Nyland is an honorable man in a helluva difficult spot in a school system that needs healing.

Charlie Mas said...

Leaders go to the whip when they cannot inspire and win support with their thoughts, words, and actions. Dr. Nyland, with this letter, concedes that he cannot win support so he must order compliance with threats.

I wonder why he doesn't enforce all laws, regulations, policies, and procedures with the same vigor.

Charlie Mas said...

"Teacher and principal contracts, as well as state certification, also require adherence to state law."

Violation of the law "will be considered as insubordination and flagrant misconduct, and it will result in the imposition of serious discipline, up to and including termination of your employment and a referral to OSPI to take action on your certificate."

Great. Now apply that standard of enforcement to all of the state and federal laws - including IDEA, Title IX, and FERPA.

I can't wait.

Anonymous said...

From Ms. Peaslee

"The very plain truth is that only our legislators can change the laws that compel SPS teachers to administer these tests. SPS is required to follow the laws. School Board Directors and the Superintendent take oaths to uphold the laws.

If you feel that the state and federal mandates should be changed please contact your legislators and let them know"


reader47

Melissa Westbrook said...

Kirk, I believe you about Dr. Nyland.

But as I said to him, early on and publicly, "You can choose to be a leader, a follower or a figurehead."

I believe he has chosen the last one.

It is clear he is NOT going to listen to parents (and frankly, that "aw shucks" thing is getting old).

So now all we can do is wait - wait for the Board elections, wait for Nyland's less-than-three years term is up and get a new superintendent.

It's a sad thing because he is in the perfect position to be a change agent.

Watching said...

I agree with Charlie. Pulling -out the whip and threatening teachers with loss of teaching certificate is REALLY over the top.

Vermont has just voted to suspend SBAC because serious issues MUST be addressed before moving forward with HIGH stake testing.

http://www.vermontbiz.com/news/march/vermont-board-education-suspends-sbac-testing

Peaslee is not known for being shy and it is time for her to speak-out against the manner in which SBAC will impact special education and ELL students. Change begins- now.

Anonymous said...

I can't believe he wrote that letter - so disrespectful. Teachers deserve better. Teachers are responsible for teaching kids how to think for themselves. How can we expect them to do that if we punish them for voicing their opinions? The parents, on the other hand, shouldn't be complaining about the test. It's a better way to inform parents of student's academic knowledge than the grades on the report card. Unfortunately, there are some teachers who manipulate students grades just to fend off the parents and admins so an A doesn't necessarily mean the student is actually meeting or exceeding standards.
KT

Anonymous said...

Here's my weekend question: At my school some teachers are giving the test but also, substitutes - they are called test proctors in my school? are all over the place. Did our schools have to pay for this our of our meager budgets, or is this a service from downtown. I know SPS pays for it either way but it feels a little less awful if the funds aren't coming directly from our building's money.

I can't ask our principal this question. Anyone remember the GoGos Our Lips Are Sealed?

SavvyVoter

Anonymous said...

Seattle Times has article today about Nyland's staff warning.

Anonymous said...

EdVoter drinking coffee reading paper above.

Maureen said...

We need Meg to put together a spreadsheet that tallies all of the monetary and nonmonetary costs of testing and who bears those costs!

Bruce B said...

Rasmussen's critique is fascinating reading (at least if you're a math and/or software geek) and makes me furious that we are wasting precious time and money on such a bad test. And this is NOT about ideology; Rasmussen (and I) believe in Common Core and in the promise of computerized testing. This is just a very bad test.

And it's not just 8 (or 16, or 24) hours. The SPS website, attempting to defend Smarter Balanced, says "Schools have been providing keyboarding practice" and "Schools have also scheduled time for students to take training tests". It says the district "bought 15,000 licenses for software that teaches keyboarding" and "sent 1,000 iPad keyboards and 2,700 laptops to schools identified as most needing support". And staff (presumably the staff that doesn't have time to support instructional programs properly) has done all sorts of analysis to manage this equipment and training. It's not just 8 hours.

Josh Hayes said...

Well, SavvyVoter, I can tell you that those sub jobs do not appear on the "Subfinder" listing, which is how subs find jobs within the district. It may well be arranged on a school-by-school basis? Arranged by the test coordinator at your school? I dunno, but I sure haven't seen those jobs listed.

Show Backbone! said...


Meanwhile, a Long Island Superintendent has the courage to inform parents the manner in which to opt-out.

http://dianeravitch.net/2015/03/23/long-island-superintendent-gamberg-tells-parents-how-to-opt-out/

Oath SEZ said...

The oath of office requires elected officials to uphold the CONSTITUTION and we all know that all laws are NOT Constitutional.

Here is the exact language:



Every person elected or appointed to the office of school director, before entering upon the discharge of the duties thereof, shall take an oath or affirmation to support the Constitution of the United States and the state of Washington and to faithfully discharge the duties of the office according to the best of his or her ability. In case any official has a written appointment or commission, the official's oath or affirmation shall be endorsed thereon and sworn to before any officer authorized to administer oaths. School officials are hereby authorized to administer all oaths or affirmations pertaining to their respective offices without charge or fee. All oaths of office, when properly made, shall be filed with the county auditor. Every person elected to the office of school director shall begin his or her term of office at the first official meeting of the board of directors following certification of the election results.

Anonymous said...

I am not against testing or the Common Core but the SBAC test is only a work in progress and yet it sounds like SPS is getting ready to use this year's tests scores to make educational decisions that will impact our teachers, schools and children. This seems unwise.

Please read the attached link: http://edsource.org/2014/smarter-balanced-tests-are-still-a-work-in-progress/69828#.VRRTjWZm0SR

- A concerned mother who has an M.Ed and specializes in psychometric testing

Stephen said...

I sent a signed and dated request with my son to school, and just received an e-mail that said I needed to use their form to opt him out.

I pointed out that SPS says that either is acceptable.

Sigh.

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